Creativity

Art, the Muse, and a Room

I’ve been thinking a lot about spaces lately. Like what goes into them and what we do with them. Sacred spaces, places that hold a special meaning to ourselves. Spaces like my studio. And my home. When I moved into my home 6 years ago, I gave my house a name: The Perch. It’s my sanctuary. I converted one room over to my artistic studio. My computer desk sits in one corner; Smudge, my Apple powerbook rests on top of it along with a few candles. My workbench is on the opposite wall, where the closet used to be. It's pretty chaotic at the moment. Bottles of Luminere paints and paper and stamps and pens litter the surface. I'm an artist and writer and when I want to be creative, I head into this room. However, I'm also very spiritual. For me, there is no separation between my daily activities and my spiritual life. The two intertwine. And that holds especially true when applied to my art.

Because I see a connection between making art and spirituality, this room transforms from just an ordinary room to something special. It's my altar where my pens and brushes and ideas in my mind mix and merge to form something tangible. The Studio is my sacred space. Like I said, sacred space is a physical or mental place that holds a special meaning or has a specific purpose to you. Mostly what's considered sacred is a feeling we get when we enter a spot that holds great importance to us. And that’s exactly what my studio’s purpose is... a special place where I can write, make art and express myself.

Keeping Track of Character Traits

When I am not trying to come up with good articles and creative tips to share with you here at D*I*Y Planner I’m playing RPG games. I’m not talking about computer games; although I do play quite a bit of World of Warcraft. I’m currently involved in two different pen and paper and dice games. One is traditional Dungeons & Dragons, set in the world of Eberron; and the other is a White Wolf Mage game, set in our world. What does playing games have to do with productivity and planners?

Amazingly, a lot.

DIY Portfolios: Showing Your Best to Clients

Portfolios are a great way to show off your best to potential clients and new job prospects. I've been out of work since last November (by choice) and recently finished a small writing contract for a local company. As I finished and was looking over my old writing portfolio, I thought about how outdated and unreflective of me and my work it seemed. There were no pieces from my last company and there were still some selections from college. So, this past weekend I decided it was time to give my portfolio a much needed upgrade and face-lift.

I have both an online (PDF) and offline portfolio that showcases my work. I wanted to show you what I did and what I found this weekend at Office Max that you can use to make a very nice and professional portfolio. If you haven't guessed, I'm rather pleased and excited as to how both turned out and wanted to show off. While I outline the steps to create a graphic design or technical writing portfolio, I'm sure that you can use these methods and steps to pull together a portfolio for any discipline.

Writing at the Speed of Thought

I write. A lot. Sometimes I have to wonder why I don't actually call myself a professional writer and have done with it, seeing that almost everything I do for a living is tied into somehow stringing words together. And, as you've probably guessed by now, I spend a lot of my time navigating both digital and analog methods of doing things (as opposed to "getting things done," which lends a different perspective on matters), and I've formed some pretty strong opinions on the various ways of laying down these words into some sort of vaguely coherent and semi-articulate flow, and occasionally with some actual purpose in mind.

Innowen's Top Five List

When Doug asked me about sharing my Top 5 Toys for inspiration, my mind started making the list. "Awesome idea," I said. At first I figured this was going to be really easy for me to do. But as I composed my list, I noticed it growing past 5. So, this is my top 5 list of current toys that help bring out my creative “gotta get it done” side.

Treasure Island...

WotNoHarrisTweed

As I read the e-mither a second time I was struck by a disapointing realisation; Doug had typed desert and not dessert island. My mind now focussed on something other than food I began to wonder; "if my briefcase didn’t contain sandwiches which five creato-productive(1) instruments would I fill it with"...








Sacha's Five Things

Here are my top five things for productivity and creativity. =)

  • Fountain pen
  • Moleskine notebook
  • Index cards
  • Cellphone
  • Happy socks

Read more for details!

Guitar chord notation form (adapted from incompetech.com)

A page of unmarked guitar fretboard images for chord notation, adapted from the one generated at Kevin MacLeod's Free Online Graph Paper/Grid Paper PDFs page.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

With Kevin MacLeod's permission, I've adapted this page of guitar fretboard images to ensure there's enough room for hole punching. Mark down the fingerings for your favorite chords, in an order that make sense to you, or draw out the chord progression of songs.

The 1-up file includes front and back for duplex printing on 5.5"x8.5" paper. Printing the 2-up file with a duplex printer requires that the printer be set to long-edge duplexing, as the first page is upside down with respect to the second.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
NA

Music Notation Staves adapted from incompetech.com

Staves for music notation, adapted from the one generated at Kevin MacLeod's Free Online Graph Paper/Grid Paper PDFs page.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

With Kevin MacLeod's permission, I've adapted this music notation paper to ensure there's enough room for hole punching. Great for putting music together when you're on the go.

The 1-up file includes front and back for duplex printing on 5.5"x8.5" paper. Printing the 2-up file with a duplex printer requires that the printer be set to long-edge duplexing, as the first page is upside down with respect to the second.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English