Pad Magic Padding Press

You-Tube Video

This looks very nice.
I may spring for one.

He sells them on ebay, seller ID is "hlymanjr"
$50 plus $10 shipping.

Other opinions ?

Syndicate content

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Wow

That is very cool. We paperphiles could have all kinds of fun with that.

But what do you call the glue he uses? Just "binding glue" or is there a more "jargony" name for it?

*edit* Never mind. I found it. "padding compound"

It is called...

Padding Compound or Padding Adhesive

Look at this thread: Making Your Own Pads of Paper

I got a quart from a local print shop for about $17
-----------------------------------
"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)

Dude...

I'm so trying the Elmer's thing until I can get some padding compound.

Man, all I need is another projecty thing to play with. *Actually, that's probably all I ever need.*

Thanks for the link, ygor.

I'd check out competing rigs before I sent money, Ygor

because I've seen others that make turning out really good paste ups much easier than this one.

It's biggest flaw is the lack of a 90 degree corner. He has a back stop that you use to align the paper along the spine, but only in one direction. The paper can still shift left/right (what ends up being top/bottom of the finished book) and you can in fact see that the book he creates in the demonstration has that flaw.

And having the paper ends not perfectly even on the top and the bottom means the pressure on those pages is uneven the whole time it sits on your bookshelf. You'll end with the pages that stick up bending, and the fact that they are under more pressure than the 'shorter' ones will eventually cause the bonding stuff between the pages of different heights to weaken/stretch/tear. :(

And, frankly, all that 'rotating around the base' is gimmickry. And using multiple slats plus a couple of wedges to create the pressure looks really clutzy to my eye.

You could make yourself a better rig for a whole lot less than $60. Really, all you need is a piece of 3/4" plywood a bit larger that then largest size of page you'll want to bind. A piece of 1"X2" a couple of inches longer than the longest spine you'll be creating. A pair of clamps that can open wide enough to accommodate the thickest book you ever plan to bind.

Jog your paper into alignment, lay it down with the future spine along the edge of the plywood. Lay the 1X2 to align with the spine on top of the pile. Attach clamps to hold it all still while you glue. (If you don't like-- or don't have access to -- clamps, a couple of wing nuts and a pair of long bolts will do nicely.

If you always do the same size (like full sized or halfsized pages, you can create a 90 degree corner the proper distance away from the spine edge, which will make getting a perfect alignment dead easy. Just use a few inches of scrap 2X4 glued to the plywood.

I put out a family cookbook a few years back using a totally improvised rig like that. I have a large guillotine style paper cutter, so I used that for the 'bed, taking advantage of the grid of lines etched into it to help with alignment. A scrap piece of 1X2, a pair of C-clamps, some wax paper to keep the glue from getting onto places it shouldn't, and that was it. Total cost, nothing. And when I was done, I simply put the wood back on the scrap pile, hung up the clamps and paper cutter, and there was no additional gizmo to store or have cluttering up my house.

It's your money, of course, but wouldn't you rather spend it on sexy new pens and notebooks instead of a klutzy rig you really don't need?

even worse...

I have two 1x4s that I drilled through, and use bolts with wing nuts to make my pads. It's a lot more work, but it was free, as it used materials I already had on hand. One could also use C-clamps to hold the boards together.

As to this one and the corners. the end piece does wrap around a bit, which helps. I thought the same thing, having used real padders in print shop. We also had a mechanical jogger to jog the paper, but that's only if you do this all day. ;-)

Thing is, I still like this one simply because it's self-contained and very compact. And it's US-made by a private entrepreneur. I will have to consider it, because I have some uses and this would make my work easier--4" is a lot to handle at one time, and his solution is quite good at that thickness. The trick is to pad a bunch of books on the edge, cut them apart and bind them after. I better quit writing before I talk myself into spending the money... ;-)

-Jon

Disagree: "It's biggest flaw is the lack of a 90 degree corner"

Check out the pix on this page:

http://www.graphic-design.com/DTG/Business/magic_press.html

Especially the bottom one that says "Brush on padding compound" -- looks like enough of an edge to line things up.
-----------------------------------
"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)

Y'all have not discouraged me

I'm looking at it as a Christmas present for myself.
I like that it can be stored in an Express Mail box.
-----------------------------------
"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)

I got one !

I recently got a minor financial windfall from a previous employer, so I decided to get one of these things.
Stay tuned !
Film @ 11 !
-----------------------------------
"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)